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SASCHA PALADINO

Something magical happens when you combine NASA and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). First of all, you can solve most of your basic word puzzles on Wheel of Fortune, but you also get an educational and entertaining mix of space, science, and, considering this concoction is being mixed on Disney Junior, a healthy dose of that wonderful Disney storytelling. As an added bonus, your kids will love it.

Miles from Tomorrowland is a new Disney Junior series full of non-stop excitement that premiers on Friday, February 6 (check local listings). It stars the voice talents of Olivia Munn (The Newsroom), Tom Kenny (SpongeBob SquarePants), Fiona Bishop (Sofia the First), and Cullen McCarthy (Mr. Peabody & Sherman) as the Callisto family, a tight-knit bunch working for the Tomorrowland Transit Authority, as they travel through space and endless adventure.

I recently had the opportunity to speak with Sascha Paladino, the creator and executive producer of Miles from Tomorrowland, about the show, his inspiration(s), and, as dads are prone to do, our kids. We can’t help it.

MILES, MERC

Whit Honea: First, congratulations on the new show. The title “Miles from Tomorrowland” is quite a clever play on words. I’m a fan of the wordplay.

Sascha Paladino: Thank you. I like to play with words, too, and luckily we get to do that on the show. We make up words. We get to make up planets, aliens, and all of that stuff. It’s a lot fun.

Disney's Paperman

If you were one of the many people to see Disney’s latest feature Wreck-It Ralph over the weekend then you were also lucky enough to see the animated short, Paperman, that preceded it. Chances are you were blown away like so many paper airplanes.

The overwhelming amazement derived from Paperman is equal parts wonderful story and beautiful animation, the proverbial chocolate and peanut butter of memorable movie-making. Paperman resembles its popular contemporary Pixar counterparts in both heart and scope. It also resembles some of the better Pixar shorts in that it doesn’t use any spoken language, relying instead on compelling art against a well-timed soundtrack and the captivating gift of storytelling. It’s a good gift.