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snow white and the seven dwarfs

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Seven Dwarfs Mine Train

The following facts and photos were supplied by Walt Disney World press and publicity in the official press kit for Seven Dwarfs Mine Train. Spoilers ahead, you’ve been warned:

Seven Dwarfs Mine Train, in the Enchanted Forest of New Fantasyland (Magic Kingdom), is a family coaster inspired by the film classic “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” that takes Walt Disney World Resort guests into the famous mine, glittering with diamonds, rubies, and other precious gems, where the Seven Dwarfs sing happily as they work.

Seven Dwarfs Mine Train is almost completely “on stage.” With its location in the middle of New Fantasyland, guests aboard the rockin’ coaster are afforded amazing views from all angles.

Seven Dwarfs Mine Train

Snow White

Walt Disney’s original animated masterpiece, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” is still the best Disney animated film in my opinion. No other film set new artistic standards and created an industry like Walt’s first animated feature. This year marks Snow’s 75th anniversary and the film will be celebrated with a state-of-the-art digital presentation at the New York Film Festival on Saturday, Sept. 29 at the prestigious Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall. The film will be introduced by acclaimed animator/director/historian Eric Goldberg, who served as supervisor of the Genie character in “Aladdin,” co-directed of “Pocahontas” and counts “Fantasia 2000” among his credits. Festival attendees will also get a sneak peek at Walt Disney Animation Studios’ newest animated short “Paperman,” an innovative new animated film that combines the best of both the CG and hand-drawn worlds. “Paperman,” directed by John Kahrs and produced by Kristina Reed (and utilizing Goldberg’s animation talents), will open in theaters in November with the hilarious arcade-game-hopping adventure “Wreck-It Ralph.”

“It’s an honor to be introducing ‘Snow White’ at this year’s New York Film Festival, marking the film’s 75th anniversary,” said Goldberg. “Walt used to refer to ‘Snow White’ as ‘the one that started it all,’ and he was right. The storytelling, the emotions, the cinematics and the comedy are all so true and so powerful, it’s astonishing to think this assured piece of filmmaking was the studio’s first feature effort. Anyone who is working or has worked in the animation medium owes ‘Snow White’ a huge debt, as it never ceases to inspire us. Walt and his team created something that is timeless: it isn’t a question of whether ‘Snow White’ is lacking in surround sound, computer graphics or stereoscopic 3D, it’s whether today’s films can measure up to ‘Snow White.'”