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You’ve just performed the hit song from Disney animation’s biggest ever hit film on stage at the Oscars, watching it win said Oscar minutes later, how are you going to top that? For Adele Dazeem Idina Menzel, it was a trip to the Tonight Show with new host Jimmy Fallon and the show’s band “The Roots” for a cover (can you cover your own song?) of “Let it Go” using only toys and classroom instruments.

It was just uploaded last night and already the video has 2.3 million views. It’s sure to become a classic, but if you haven’t seen it yet, we can help:

I like that the toy alphabet blocks Jimmy grabbed are L-I-G for Let it Go. Full instrument list below the jump:

Lincoln - Window

When I heard that Dreamworks movies would be distributed by the Walt Disney Studios, I immediately thought of how terrific it would be if Disney was able to distribute “Lincoln,” the movie Spielberg had been working on since 2001. If you’ve read even the shortest biography of Walt Disney you know that he admired Lincoln as our nation’s finest president. When Walt chose the first human being to be represented by an audio-animatronic, it was Lincoln who would once again wow the masses with his oratory. He has his own attraction at Disneyland and is featured in Walt Disney World’s Hall of Presidents.

Lincoln has not be neglected by films either. Among the many times he’s appeared in the theaters, Henry Fonda played the 16th president in “Young Mr. Lincoln” in a film by John Ford and Raymond Massey played him twice, once in “Abe Lincoln in Illinois” and once in “How the West was Won.” Hal Holbrook, one of my favorite actors, won an emmy for his 1976 portrayal of Lincoln in an acclaimed TV special. (Holbrook reprised the role in the mid 80’s TV mini-series “North & South”).

Holbrook also has a role in Spielberg’s Lincoln, but it’s not the President. That role is filled impressively by Daniel Day-Lewis who took over from Liam Neeson who declared himself too old. Day-Lewis reportedly took a year to become Lincoln as part of his preparation for the role and would periodically text his co-actors in the voice of Lincoln as they prepared for the film. This all pays off when Day-Lewis disappears from the screen and you are watching Honest Abe work his way through these tumultuous moments in history. Day-Lewis’s ability to become the person he is portraying will no doubt earn him another academy award nomination and likely a third gold statue when all the votes are in.

I have reviewed a lot of movies for a lot of different media outlets, including, but not limited to, the majority of Pixar films. However, I’ve never written a whole article about a Pixar short, and it is time that changed. La Luna is the reason.

La Luna was created, written, and directed by Enrico Casarosa, who had previously worked on Cars, Up, and Ratatouille, and it was nominated for an Academy Award (Best Short Film). It deserved it.

If you have ever wondered what it is like to be nominated for an Oscar, here is how  Casarosa described it:

I woke up and  I let all my family sleep, but I made myself a coffee and I was in the dark in the kitchen, trying to figure out where they would put it because they don’t really mention us little guys in the show.  You have to go look for it.  But once you find out…I love that moment of that quiet, personal moment of me and a cup of coffee.  Then it turned into text and then it’s a mess, and  emails of all these people kind of congratulating me.

So I really felt great,  the feeling of a nomination feels wonderful, but,  the thing I remember the most is just the outpouring from all over the place, people coming through the woodwork to say hi and congratulations, which is really great, and that kind of strange quiet moment.

It was not a bad day.

I bet.

The story of La Luna runs seven minutes and does not use any spoken language, aside from shrugs, looks, and some mumbling that only the characters can understand. It’s a family thing.

The film covers the first night on the job for a little boy entering the family business with his father and grandfather. The men do not get along and the boy is forever stuck between them.