SeaWorld Orlando Takes Over Care for Stranded Pilot Whale

Ever since SeaWorld exited the embrace of that beer beverage company, they have been moving to position themselves with a brand built on the care and conservation of our planet. That’s a pretty big mission for what was essentially a series of amusement and sea life parks. And I’m sure they have miles of bumpy roads ahead of them on this journey.

In the meantime, SeaWorld continues to work hard at fulfilling its mission. Early this morning, SeaWorld Orlando’s animal experts and rescue team transported a young pilot whale to the park’s new Cetacean Rehabilitation Facility. The 9-foot, nearly 600-pound whale was being cared for in Key Largo, Fla., by SeaWorld staff and other volunteers after it and 20 other pilot whales beached themselves in the lower Keys in early May.

The National Marine Fisheries Service and other animal experts considered the two-year-old female whale to be a “dependent calf” that could not be returned to the wild and was in dire need of extensive hands-on treatment. SeaWorld Orlando was chosen to provide a home and long-term care for the animal because of the park’s experience with pilot whales and expertise in animal husbandry and care, especially with stranded animals.

For the five-hour trip to Orlando, the whale was carefully placed in a stretcher and then into a large, water-filled transport unit in a cooled truck. The whale was continually monitored by park animal experts and chief veterinarian, Dr. Chris Dold, during the trip. According to Dold, “It’s still too early to tell her long-term prognosis, but she traveled well, she’s getting settled into her new surroundings, and we’re cautiously optimistic about her future.”

This pilot whale calf is the first resident of SeaWorld’s new, 40,000-gallon rehabilitation pool, a facility designed specifically to rehabilitate whales and dolphins rescued from the wild. At the facility, the park’s animal experts will monitor the whale round the clock, performing physical examinations and additional testing. SeaWorld’s goal is to have her join the company’s other pilot whales in the near term.

In the past 45 years, more than 18,000 animals have been rescued and cared for by SeaWorld’s animal rescue experts. The ultimate goal for every animal SeaWorld rescues is to return it to the wild. For the few the government deems unable to survive on their own, such as this pilot whale, SeaWorld is willing to provide a permanent home.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Shout it
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)
This entry was posted in Florida Attractions and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to SeaWorld Orlando Takes Over Care for Stranded Pilot Whale

  1. Pingback: The Disney Blog

  2. Pingback: Alltop Disney

Comments are closed.